THE HORROR JAR: THE UNIVERSAL MUMMY SERIES

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imhotep

Boris Karloff as Im Ho Tep/The Mummy in THE MUMMY (1932).

 

Welcome back to THE HORROR JAR, that column where we look at odds and ends pertaining to horror movies.

Up today it’s the Universal MUMMY series. Never as popular as Universal’s other monsters- Dracula, Frankenstein, and the Wolf Man— the Mummy nonetheless appeared in five Universal horror movies and one comedy starring Abbott and Costello. As such, the Universal Mummy movies are significant. In fact, one of the Mummy movies, the first one, THE MUMMY (1932) ranks as one of the best Universal monster films ever made.

So, let’s get to it. Here’s a look at the Universal MUMMY movies:

 

1. THE MUMMY (1932)

mummy 1932 karloff - johann

Im Ho Tep (Boris Karloff) reveals his secret to Helen Grosvenor (Zita Johann) in THE MUMMY (1932).

 

73 minutes; Directed by Karl Freund; Screenplay by John L. Balderston, based on a story by Nina Wilcox Putnam, and a story by Richard Schayer; Imhotep/Mummy: Boris Karloff

As I said, THE MUMMY, Universal’s first Mummy movie, is one of the finest Universal monster movies ever made. There are a couple of reasons for this. The number one reason, really, is director Karl Freund.

Freund, a well-respected cinematographer, was in charge of the cinematography in DRACULA (1931). His work here as the director of THE MUMMY, with its innovative camerawork and masterful use of light and shadows, is superior to the directorial efforts of both Tod Browning on DRACULA (1931) and James Whale on FRANKENSTEIN (1931). The only stumbling block by Freund is the ending, as the film’s conclusion is choppy and inferior to the rest of the movie.

The other reason is Boris Karloff’s performance as Im Ho Tep, the Mummy. Unlike subsequent Mummy movies, in which the monster remained in bandages, here, Im Ho Tep sheds his bandages and becomes a threat quite unlike later Mummy interpretations. Karloff of course is famous for his portrayal of the Frankenstein Monster, and rightly so, but his performance here as Im Ho Tep is one of his best.

The story in THE MUMMY is quite similar to the story told in DRACULA, which is no surprise since it was written by John L.Balderston, who had written one of the DRACULA plays on which the 1931 movie was based. In fact, it’s THE MUMMY with its story of reincarnated love which later versions of DRACULA borrowed heavily from, films like Dan Curtis’ DRACULA (1974) starring Jack Palance, and Francis Ford Coppola’s BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA (1992), both of which featured love stories between Dracula and Mina, a love story that did not appear in Stoker’s novel or the 1931 Bela Lugosi film. But it does appear here in THE MUMMY (1932).

And unlike DRACULA and FRANKENSTEIN, THE MUMMY was not based on a literary work but was instead inspired by the events surrounding the opening of King Tut’s tomb in 1925.

THE MUMMY also features superior make-up by Jack Pierce, the man also responsible for the make-up on Karloff’s Frankenstein Monster and on Lon Chaney Jr.s’ Wolf Man. The Im Ho Tep make-up is creepy and chilling.

THE MUMMY contains frightening scenes, like when the Mummy is first resurrected by the young man reading from the Scroll of Thoth. The soundtrack is silent as the Mummy’s hand slowly enters the frame and grabs the scroll from the desk.

THE MUMMY also has a nice cast. In addition to Boris Karloff, Edward Van Sloan is on hand as the Van Helsing-like Doctor Muller, David Manners plays dashing Frank Whemple, and the very sexy Zita Johann plays Helen Grosvenor, Im Ho Tep’s reincarnated love.

One of Universal’s best horror movies, THE MUMMY is not to be missed.

 

2. THE MUMMY’S HAND (1940)

mummy's hand

Kharis (Tom Tyler) attacks hero Steve Banning (Dick Foran) in THE MUMMY’S HAND (1940).

 

67 minutes; Directed by Christy Cabanne; Screenplay by Griffin Jay; Kharis/The Mummy: Tom Tyler

Universal’s second MUMMY movie was not a direct sequel to THE MUMMY (1932). Instead, it told a brand new story with a brand new Mummy. It also took on a completely different tone. Rather than being eerie and frightening, THE MUMMY’S HAND is light and comical, with the emphasis on adventure rather than horror. The Brendan Frasier MUMMY movies from the late 1990s-early 2000s borrowed heavily from the style of THE MUMMY’S HAND.

THE MUMMY’S HAND follows two adventurous American archeologists in Egypt, Steve Banning (Dick Foran) and Babe Jenson (Wallace Ford) as they seek the tomb of the Princess Ananka. They are joined by a magician Solvani (Cecil Kelloway) and his daughter Marta (Peggy Moran) who agree to fund the expedition. They run afoul of the evil high priest Andoheb (George Zucco) who unleashes the deadly Mummy Kharis (Tom Tyler) on them in order to prevent them from stealing from the tomb of the princess.

Kharis the Mummy is the first of what would become the classic interpretation of the Mummy in the movies: the slow-moving mute monster wrapped in bandages, a far cry from Karloff’s superior interpretation in THE MUMMY, but it’s the one that caught on. People simply love monsters, and Kharis is more a movie monster than Im Ho Tep. Kharis is also mute since in this story when he was buried alive, his tongue was cut. Ouch!

Jack Pierce again did the Mummy make-up, and it’s not bad,  I prefer the Im Ho Tep make-up much better.

Tom Tyler is average at best as the Mummy. Any stunt man could have done the same. He doesn’t really bring much to the performance, and for me, Kharis the Mummy is a weak link in this film.

The highlight of THE MUMMY’S HAND is the comical banter between Dick Foran and Wallace Ford. They’re amusing and highly entertaining.

Other than THE MUMMY, THE MUMMY’S HAND is the only other of the Universal Mummy series that received critical praise. I like THE MUMMY’S HAND well enough, but I actually prefer the next film in the series better, and that’s because Lon Chaney Jr. joined the series as Kharis, and would play the Mummy in the next three films.

 

3. THE MUMMY’S TOMB (1942)

Mummys-Tomb-kharis

Lon Chaney Jr. takes over the role of Kharis, the Mummy, in THE MUMMY’S TOMB (1942).

 

61 minutes; Directed by Harold Young; Screenplay by Griffin Jay and Henry Sucher; Kharis/The Mummy: Lon Chaney, Jr.

THE MUMMY’S TOMB is a direct sequel to THE MUMMY’S HAND. In fact, the first ten minutes of the film recap the events from THE MUMMY’S HAND. The story takes place thirty years later, and Stephen Banning (Dick Foran) is retired in Massachusetts, enjoying time spent with his adult son John (John Hubbard) and his son’s fiance Isobel (Elyse Knox).

All is well until the nefarious Mehemet Bey (Turhan Bey) arrives in town with Kharis (Lon Chaney Jr.) to finish the job of punishing those who raided Princess Ananka’s tomb.

The story here is pretty standard, as are the production values. The Mummy series at this point had definitely entered the world of the 1940s movie serials. Everything about this movie and the next two are quick and cheap. Yet—.

Yet— I really like THE MUMMY’S TOMB, and other than THE MUMMY (1932), it’s my favorite of the Universal Mummy movies. The number one reason is Lon Chaney Jr.’s performance as Kharis. Say what you want about Chaney, as the years go by, his reputation as an actor continues to grow. Back in the day, he received well-deserved praise for his portrayal of Larry Talbot aka The Wolf Man, but that was about it. His other portrayals in horror movies were often dismissed. Not so anymore.

He brings some character to Kharis and imbues life into the monster. He’s been criticized for being too heavy to portray an Egyptian mummy, but you know what? His considerable bulk— not fat, mind you, but solid bulk— is quite frightening! And that’s my favorite part about THE MUMMY’S TOMB: Kharis, in spite of the fact that he might lose a foot race to Michael Myers— it would be close!—is damned scary! Sure, you might outrun him, but if he gets you in a corner, it’s over! Jack Pierce’s make-up here on Kharis is also my favorite of the entire series.

Speaking of best of the series, THE MUMMY’S TOMB has, not only the best ending in the entire Universal series, but I’d argue it has the best ending of any Mummy movie period! Sure, its torch-wielding villagers which chase Kharis borrows heavily from FRANKENSTEIN (1931)— in fact, some of the same footage was used— but once the action reaches the house, and the subsequent chase inside the house, that stuff is all tremendously exciting and well-done.

On the other hand, since this story takes place thirty years after the events of THE MUMMY’S HAND, it should be set in 1970, but in the timeless world of Universal classic horror, the action is still occurring in the 1940s. I won’t say anything if you won’t.

 

4. THE MUMMY’S GHOST (1944)

mummys-ghost-kharis-mummy-lon-chaney-jr

Kharis (Lon Chaney, Jr.) is back at it again in THE MUMMY’S GHOST (1944).

 

61 minutes;  Directed by Reginald Le Borg; Screenplay by Griffin Jay, Henry Sucher, and Brenda Weisberg; Kharis/The Mummy: Lon Chaney Jr.

THE MUMMY’S GHOST is my least favorite film in the series, other than the Abbott and Costello film. A direct sequel to THE MUMMY’S TOMB, Yousef Bey (John Carradine) arrives in Massachusetts to reclaim the bodies of Kharis (Lon Chaney Jr.) and Princess Ananka. When Kharis turns out to be still alive, and the Princess reincarnated in the body of a college student Amina (Ramsay Ames), Bey feels as if he’s hit the lottery. He decides to make Amina his bride, which doesn’t sit well with Kharis, since after all Amina/Ananka was his girlfriend back in the day!

The reason I’m not crazy about THE MUMMY’S GHOST is that it doesn’t really offer anything new. It’s just kind of there, going through the motions. Lon Chaney Jr.’s performance as Kharis isn’t as effective here as it was in THE MUMMY’S TOMB, nor is Jack Pierce’s make-up. The use of a Mummy mask on Chaney rather than make-up is much more prominent here.

Even the presence of John Carradine, Robert Lowery who would go on to play Batman a few years later in the serial BATMAN AND ROBIN (1949), and KING KONG’s Frank Reicher doesn’t help. I like the return to the reincarnated lover plot point, but even that doesn’t really lift this one, as that plot element was handled much better and with more conviction in THE MUMMY.

 

5. THE MUMMY’S CURSE (1944)

Mummys-Curse

Kharis (Lon Chaney Jr.) on the prowl in the swamps of Louisiana in THE MUMMY’S CURSE (1944).

 

60 minutes; Directed by Leslie Goodwins; Screenplay by Bernard Schubert; Kharis/The Mummy: Lon Chaney Jr.

Inexplicably, Kharis (Lon Chaney Jr.) and Princess Ananka are now located in Louisiana, having somehow moved there from Massachusetts! The story here in THE MUMMY’S CURSE is pretty much nonexistent. It’s pretty much just an excuse to feature Kharis the Mummy stalking the swamps of Lousiana.

But that’s the reason THE MUMMY’S CURSE is superior to the previous installment, THE MUMMY’S GHOST. Lon Chaney Jr. returns to frightening form, and watching Kharis terrorize the bayous of Louisiana is pretty chilling. THE MUMMY’S CURSE is chock full of atmosphere and eerieness, in spite of not having much of a story. As such, I always seem to enjoy watching this one.

 

6. ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE MUMMY (1955)

abbott-and-costello-meet-the-mummy-lou-costello-bud-abbot-promotional-pictures-klaris-the-mummy

Bud and Lou want their Mummy in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE MUMMY (1955).

 

79 minutes; Directed by Charles Lamont; Screenplay by John Grant; Klaris/The Mummy: Eddie Parker.

After the success of ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948), one of the best horror comedies ever made, the comedy duo of But Abbott and Lou Costello met some other monsters as well, in such movies as ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE INVISIBLE MAN (1951), ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE (1953), and they would meet their final monster in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE MUMMY (1955).

While Abbott and Costello are almost always good for a decent laugh here and there, this vehicle ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE MUMMY is probably my least favorite of their films where they meet a Universal monster. The gags are okay, but not great. The Mummy, named Klaris here rather than Kharis, is pretty pathetic-looking. And for some reason even though Bud Abbott and Lou Costello play characters named Pete and Freddie, in the movie they simply call each other Bud and Lou. This may have been done to be funny, but it comes off as if they weren’t taking this film very seriously.

ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET THE MUMMY has no connection to any of the previous Universal Mummy movies. It’s not a bad movie, but neither is it all that great.

Well, there you have it. A look at the Universal MUMMY movies. I hope you will join me again next time for another HORROR JAR column where we will look at odds and ends from other horror movies.

Until then, thanks for reading!

—Michael

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES: ABBOTT and COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948)

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Bud Abbott and Lou Costello have a lot to say about the Frankenstein monster, the Wolf Man, and Dracula in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948)

Bud Abbott and Lou Costello have a lot to say about the Frankenstein monster (Glenn Strange), the Wolf Man (Lon Chaney Jr.), and Dracula (Bela Lugosi) in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948)

MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES:  ABBOTT & COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948)

By

Michael Arruda

Welcome to another edition of MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES, that column where we look at great quotes from some really great movies. Today we look at ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN (1948), one of the funniest horror comedies ever made.  It’s chock full of classic lines.

It’s actually one of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello’s funniest films.  While the monsters— Bela Lugosi as Dracula, Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolf Man, and Glenn Strange as the Frankenstein monster— play it straight, Bud and Lou tickle your funny bone, and they’ve rarely been funnier.

So let’s check out some of their jokes.  Here’s a look at some memorable quotes from ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN, screenplay by Robert Lees, Frederic I. Rinaldo, and John Grant.  All three of these writers had a ton of writing credits, including many other Abbott and Costello movies, so it’s no wonder that this film is so funny.

Here we go:

After being pursued by Dracula (Bela Lugosi) and his vampire assistant Sandra (Lenore Aubert), Wilbur (Lou Costello) has had his fill of vampires out to get him.  When he asks his buddy Chick (Bud Abbott) a question, Chick replies:

CHICK:  I’ll bite.

WILBUR:  No, you gotta stand in line.

In addition to being chased by Sandra, Wilbur is also pursued by another woman, Joan (Jane Randolph).  In fact, women seem to be falling all over Wilbur in this movie, something that Chick just can’t seem to understand.

CHICK:  I don’t get it. Out of all the guys around here that classy dish has to pick out a guy like you.

WILBUR:  What’s wrong with that?

CHICK:  Go look at yourself in the mirror sometime.

WILBUR:  Why should I hurt my own feelings?

Later, when Wilbur has two dates to the costume ball, Chick tries to talk him into sharing one of his dates with him.

CHICK:   You know the old saying? Everything comes in threes. Now suppose a third girl should fall in love with you?

WILBUR:  What’s her name?

CHICK: We’ll say her name is Mary.

WILBUR: Is she pretty?

CHICK: Beautiful!

WILBUR: Naturally, she’d have to be.

CHICK: Now you have Mary, you have Joan, and you have Sandra. So, to prove to you that I’m your pal, your bosom friend, I’ll take one of the girls off your hands.

WILBUR: Chick, you’re what I call a real pal… you take Mary.

This next exchange comes when Wilbur is arguing with his employer, Mr. McDougal.

WILBUR:  Well that’s gonna cost you overtime because I’m a union man and I work only sixteen hours a day.

MCDOUGAL:  A union man only works eight hours a day.

WILBUR:  I belong to two unions.

Then there’s this conversation when Chick tries to convince the frightened Wilbur that Dracula doesn’t really exist.

WILBUR:  (reading):  “Count Dracula sleeps in his coffin but rises every night at sunset.”  Chick is right.  This is awful silly stuff.  Dracula— (coffin creaks).  Chick!  Chick!

CHICK:  What’s the matter now?

WILBUR:  You know that person you said that there’s no such person?

CHICK:  Yes.

WILBUR:  I think he’s in there.  In person.  I was reading this sign over here, this one down here, Dracula’s legend.  All of a sudden I hear (makes a creaking sound).

CHICK:  That’s the wind!

WILBUR:  It should get oiled!

CHICK:  Listen, stop reading this thing!  That’s a lot of phony baloney to fool McDougal’s customers!  Now pull up that canvas and get busy.  Come on!  (Exits)

WILBUR (reading):  “Dracula can change himself at will into a vampire bat flying about the countryside.”  Flying.  (Pretends to fly and sees Dracula attempting to climb out of his coffin).  Chick!!!  Chick!!!

CHICK (returns):  Listen.  You’re making enough noise to wake up the dead.

WILBUR:  I don’t have to wake him up.  He’s up.  I saw a hand.

CHICK:  You saw a hand?  Where?

WILBUR:  Right over there.  (points to coffin).  I saw a hand there!

CHICK:  You don’t know what you’re talking about!  You’re all excited reading this legend.  Now, listen.  Listen, Wilbur.  I know there’s no such a person as Dracula. You know there’s no such a person as Dracula.

WILBUR:  But does Dracula know it?

The monsters get in on the action as well.  Here’s one of my favorite lines from the movie, when Larry Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.) tries to warn Wilbur and Chick about his condition, that he’s a werewolf.

LARRY TALBOT:  You don’t understand. Every night when the moon is full, I turn into a wolf.

WILBUR:  You and twenty million other guys.

And then there’s this memorable line from Dracula (Bela Lugosi):

DRACULA:  Young people making the most of life – while it lasts.

Gulp!

Of course this line is even more effective because Bela Lugosi is saying it.  Incidentally, this is the second and last time Lugosi played Dracula in the movies, although he did play a vampire— just not Dracula— in other films.

Okay.  That’s it for now.  I hope you enjoyed these memorable lines of dialogue from ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN.  I’ll see you next time with another edition of MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES.

—Michael

MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES: THE WOLF MAN (1941)

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Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolf Man doesn't have much to say, but his supporting cast does.  Check it out.

Lon Chaney Jr. as the Wolf Man doesn’t have much to say, but his supporting cast does. Check it out.

MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES:  THE WOLF MAN (1941)

By

Michael Arruda

 

Even a man who is pure in heart

And says his prayers by night

May become a wolf when the wolfs bane blooms

And the autumn moon is bright

 

 

We’ve all heard this little ditty.  It’s from THE WOLF MAN (1941) Universal’s classic werewolf movie starring Lon Chaney Jr. as everybody’s favorite werewolf, Larry Talbot.  THE WOLF MAN also boasts a fantastic supporting cast, one of the best ever assembled for a Universal monster movie, led by Claude Rains as Larry’s father Sir John Talbot, and also featuring Maria Ouspenskaya as Maleva the Gypsy woman, and Ralph Bellamy, Evelyn Ankers, Patric Knowles, and Bela Lugosi.

 

Welcome to another edition of MEMORABLE MOVIE QUOTES, that column where we look at neat quotes from even neater movies.  Today’s subject is THE WOLF MAN, one of my favorite Universal monster movies. 

 

Now, unlike Bela Lugosi as Dracula, or even Boris Karloff as the Frankenstein monster, both of whom uttered now famous lines in their roles, Lon Chaney Jr.’s Larry Talbot/The Wolf Man is not really known for the classic lines he said, unless you include his incessant whining about wanting to die and being cursed eternally.  But that doesn’t mean there aren’t memorable lines in THE WOLF MAN.  There are.  Plenty of them.

 

Let’s get started.  Here’s a look at some memorable quotes from THE WOLF MAN, screenplay by Curt Siodmark.

 

We’ll start with the poem above, spoken several times during the movie.  It’s one of the first times Larry hears about werewolves.  He hears this poem, not once, but several times, and the legend of lycanthropy begins to creep into his being.

 

This ditty became so prevalent and accepted that it was actually credited later as being “an ancient gypsy rhyme” when in reality it was simply made up by screenwriter Curt Siodmark.  Now, that’s good writing!

 

One of the most memorable characters in THE WOLF MAN is Maleva (Maria Ouspenskaya), the old gypsy woman whose son Bela (Bela Lugosi) is the werewolf who bites Larry Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.) and turns him into a werewolf.  Maleva becomes a central character in the story because she helps Larry deal with his new condition.

 

In a key scene, Larry watches from the shadows as Maleva speaks to her deceased son inside a crypt, who’s dead because Larry killed him, thinking he had killed a wolf.  Larry listens from the shadows as Maleva delivers a final blessing to her dead son.  Let’s listen:

 

MALEVA:  The way you walked was thorny, through no fault of your own, but as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea, so tears run to a predestined end. Your suffering is over, Bela my son. Now you will find peace.

Later, when Maleva and Larry Talbot first meet, she tries to warn him, telling him that he has been bitten by a werewolf, but Larry doesn’t want to believe it.

 

MALEVA:  You killed the wolf.

LARRY TALBOT: Well, there’s no crime in that is there?

MALEVA: The wolf was Bela.

LARRY: You think I don’t know the difference between a wolf and a man?

MALEVA: Bela became a wolf and you killed him. A werewolf can only be killed by a silver bullet, or a silver knife or a stick with a silver handle.

LARRY TALBOT: You’re insane! I tell you, I killed a wolf! A plain, ordinary wolf!

MALEVA: Whoever is bitten by a werewolf and lives, becomes a werewolf himself.

When the police question Larry after Jenny Williams is killed by a wolf, and Bela the Gypsy is found dead next to her with his skull crushed by Larry Talbot’s cane, they want to know from Larry what happened.  He tells them he killed a wolf, not a man, but as they insist the cane killed a man, not a wolf, Larry’s frustration grows, until the questioning is stopped by family friend and doctor, Doctor Lloyd, who is quite patronizing of Larry in this scene.

LARRY TALBOT:  Don’t try to make me believe that I killed a man when I know that I killed a wolf!

DOCTOR LLOYD: [patronizing Larry] Yes, yes. We’re all a bit confused.

And in keeping with the theme of the original shooting script called DESTINY, in which Larry Talbot would have transformed into a werewolf only in his mind, Doctor Lloyd answers Larry’s question about whether or not he believes in werewolves with this answer:

LARRY TALBOT:  Do you believe in werewolves, doctor?

DOCTOR LLOYD:  I believe a man lost in the mazes of his own mind may imagine that he’s anything.

Claude Rains has some great lines as Larry Talbot’s father, Sir John Talbot, like this classic one when he chastises Inspector Montford for being too impatient regarding his investigation of Bela the gypsy’s death:

SIR JOHN TALBOT:  You policemen are always in such a hurry. As if dead men hadn’t all eternity.

And this line when he comments to Larry about his religious beliefs:

SIR JOHN TALBOT: All astronomers are amateurs. When it comes to the heavens, there’s only one professional.

Sir John is probably my favorite character in the movie, not because he’s likable, but because he’s the main reason why his son Larry Talbot is disturbed in the first place.  It’s a great performance by Claude Rains, and other than his role as Captain Louis Renault in CASABLANCA (1942), it’s probably my favorite Claude Rains role.

Sir John isn’t intentionally mean to his son. He inflicts his damage inadvertently.  Nearly everything he says somehow hurts Larry, even though he means well.  Like this example towards the end of the movie when he berates his son for believing in werewolves:

SIR JOHN TALBOT:  You can’t run away.

LARRY TALBOT: That’s it! That’s what she said.

SIR JOHN: Who?

LARRY: The gypsy woman.

SIR JOHN: Gypsy woman? Now we’re getting down to it. She’s been filling your mind with this gibberish. This talk of werewolves and pentagrams. You’re not a child Larry, you’re a grown man and you believe in the superstitions of a Gypsy woman!

And in of the movie’s best scenes, when Sir John decides to prove to Larry that he’s not a werewolf, he ties his son to a chair inside Talbot castle, and you can see Larry appreciating his father’s efforts, but then Sir John is called to leave his son and join the villagers in their hunt for the werewolf.

LARRY: But you’re going to stay with me, aren’t you?

SIR JOHN:  Oh no, I’ve got to go, Larry.  These people have a problem.  You must make your own fight.

You can just see the light go out of Larry’s face. The fact is his father is just never there for him.  There’s a lot going on in THE WOLF MAN, more than what you usually find in a horror movie.  The story works on multiple levels.  It’s a great movie.

I hope you enjoyed these quotes from THE WOLF MAN, and that you will join me again next time when I examine great quotes from another classic movie.

Thanks for reading!

—Michael

 

Books by Michael Arruda:

TIME FRAME,  science fiction novel by Michael Arruda.  

Ebook version:  $2.99. Available at http://www.neconebooks.com. Print version:  $18.00.  Email your order request to mjarruda33@gmail.com. Also available at Amazon.com.

IN THE SPOOKLIGHT, movie review collection by Michael Arruda.

InTheSpooklight_NewText

 Ebook version:  $4.99.  Available at http://www.neconebooks.com.  Print version:  $18.00.  Email your order request to mjarruda33@gmail.com. Also available at Amazon.com.

FOR THE LOVE OF HORROR, short story collection by Michael Arruda.  

For The Love Of Horror cover

Ebook version:  $4.99.  Available at http://www.neconebooks.com. Print version:  $18.00.  Email your order request to mjarruda33@gmail.com. Also available at Amazon.com.  

 

PICTURE OF THE DAY: FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN (1943) PREMIERE

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St. Louis premiere of FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN

St. Louis premiere of FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN

PICTURE OF THE DAY:  FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN (1943) – Premiere

 

Here’s a picture of the artwork from the 1943 premiere of everybody’s favorite movie monster battle, FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN (1943).

 

According to the source, this comes from a theater in St. Louis.  I found this image on The Blog of Frankenstein, located at http://blog-of-frankenstein.blogspot.com/2012/09/1943-st-louis-cinema-front-display-for.html.

 

 

I love the artwork.  It would be a hoot to return to this time, when movies like FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN were scary, when people screamed when they saw Lon Chaney Jr.’s Wolf Man, and I’m sure that they did scream.

 

I wonder what that guy in the doorway was thinking when this picture was taken.  Why are you taking a picture of me?  Is that my ride? Do you have a license to be carrying that camera?

 

He looks kind of official.  Kinda reminds me of Marvel’s Agent Coulson.  Perhaps he was on the lookout for some future Agents of SHIELD.  Speaking of which, the Wolf Man would have made a nice addition to the team, and it would have given Larry Talbot a purpose in life.  He might even have finally stopped whining about his sad fate.

 

I also like the reflection in the glass doorway of the vintage automobile, which back then, was probably brand new.

 

It’s almost Halloween, time to appreciate and enjoy the classics of horror, and FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN is definitely a movie that deserves both recognition and a look during this horror movie season.

 

So, should you check out the movie this Halloween, start out with a look at this photo, and imagine if you will a time when FRANKENSTEIN MEETS THE WOLF MAN was still scary, when it was showing on the big screen, and imagine that you’re inside that theater surrounded by friends, eating candy and popcorn, and the Wolf Man appears on screen, and the theater erupts in a massive scream of terror.

 

Ah, the good old days!

 

Enjoy!

 

—Michael

 

IN THE SPOOKLIGHT: THE MUMMY’S TOMB (1942)

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the-mummys-tomb-lon-chaney-john-everettHere’s my latest IN THE SPOOKLIGHT column, on the Lon Chaney Jr. Mummy movie THE MUMMY’S TOMB (1942), appearing now in the July issue of the HWA NEWSLETTER.

—Michael

  IN THE SPOOKLIGHT

BY

MICHAEL ARRUDA

With apologies to Michael Myers, Kharis the Mummy just might be the scariest monster who can’t outrun a turtle ever to lumber across a movie screen!  And he’s never been more frightening than in today’s SPOOKLIGHT feature, THE MUMMY’S TOMB (1942).

THE MUMMY’S TOMB has always been my favorite Kharis MUMMY movie.  The make-up here on Kharis by Jack Pierce, the man who created most of the iconic Universal monsters, including Boris Karloff’s Monster in FRANKENSTEIN (1931), is by far the best MUMMY make-up of the Kharis series.

It’s also my favorite due to nostalgic reasons, as I owned an 8mm Castle Films copy of it when I was a kid.  The film also boasts the most exciting ending of any MUMMY movie, period.

Kharis the Mummy was featured in four Universal Mummy movies, and in the Hammer Films remake THE MUMMY (1959) starring Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee as Kharis, but it was Lon Chaney Jr. who played the definitive Kharis, appearing in three Universal Mummy movies, the first being THE MUMMY’S TOMB.

THE MUMMY’S TOMB opens with a comprehensive synopsis of the previous film in the series, THE MUMMY’S HAND (1940), so if you’ve missed this first movie, no need to worry!  The initial ten minutes of THE MUMMY’S TOMB brings you up to speed on previous events quite nicely.  You can almost hear the voice-over narration, “Previously on THE MUMMY’S HAND.”

Stephen Banning (Dick Foran) the main character from THE MUMMY’S HAND recounts his adventures in that first movie to his son John (John Hubbard) and his future daughter-in-law Isobel (Elyse Knox), and his story is shown via flashbacks.  Little does Stephen know that over in Egypt the high priest he thought he killed, Andoheb (George Zucco) still lives, albeit he’s now an old man, as thirty years have passed since the events of THE MUMMY’S HAND.  Hmm.  With this timeline, shouldn’t THE MUMMY’S TOMB be taking place in 1970?  Where are all the hippies?

Andoheb now turns over the Mummy-caring duties to his young protégé, Mehemet Bey (Turhan Bey) because Kharis the Mummy didn’t die either.  Not only is Kharis still alive, but he’s put on some weight!   Has he been eating too many tanna leaves?  No, he’s just being played here by the husky Lon Chaney Jr. rather than Tom Tyler, who played him in THE MUMMY’S HAND.

Chaney has been criticized over the years for being too big and thick to look like an authentic Mummy, but I’ve always liked this look, as it made him scarier.  I mean, Chaney isn’t flabby and overweight.  He’s solid and huge, like he could crush a man with his fists.

Mehemet Bey brings Kharis to the United States, to Massachusetts to be exact, to hunt down and kill the members of the Banning family.

And that’s pretty much it in terms of plot.  The screenplay by Griffin Jay and Henry Sucher is pretty standard.

The strength of THE MUMMY’S TOMB is not its plot but its visuals.  The movie contains some really neat scenes, and Kharis has never looked creepier.  Shots of Kharis closing in on his victims still make me shudder, and some of the murder scenes in this one are downright brutal.  Director Harold Young, not known for his genre work, really deserves a lot of credit for making a very chilling monster movie.

Young also makes good use of shadows here.  Many times we see Kharis only through his shadow.  In fact, when Kharis creeps across the countryside at night, he is unseen except for his shadow which falls upon several unsuspecting townsfolk.  The shadow is used so frequently I’ve often wondered if the shooting script was entitled THE SHADOW OF THE MUMMY.

There’s a curious moment in the movie in the scene where Kharis attacks Babe (Wallace Ford), another character from THE MUMMY’S HAND.  After Babe shouts out Kharis’ name, Kharis’ lips move as if he’s saying something in response.  It looks almost as if a scene of dialogue has been cut from the film.  I’ve never read anything to support such a cut, and it wouldn’t make sense in terms of the story anyway, since Kharis had his tongue cut from his mouth in the previous film, and is mute.  But if you watch this scene, you definitely will see Kharis’ mouth move, and a cut does appear to have taken place right at this moment.  Interesting.

The ending is exceedingly memorable.  The torch-wielding villagers, in a chase scene reminiscent of the ending to FRANKENSTEIN (1931)- in fact, some of the footage from FRANKENSTEIN is used here— chase Kharis, who’s carrying an unconscious Isobel, and trap him inside a large house.  John Banning, the sheriff, and another man run inside the house to rescue Isobel.  The climactic battle on the second story porch between John, the sheriff and Kharis, while the villagers fling burning torches from below, is pretty exciting.  I can’t think of another MUMMY movie that has a better ending than this one.

The cast is standard, and other than Lon Chaney Jr. as Kharis, no one really jumps out at you.  However the beautiful Elyse Knox who plays Isobel is notable because she’s Mark Harmon’s mother.  Ms. Knox only recently passed away, in 2012 at age 94.

Lon Chaney Jr. actually does a stand up job as Kharis the Mummy.  Chaney played all four main movie monsters:  The Wolf Man, the Mummy, Dracula, and the Frankenstein Monster.  While he’s most famous for his portrayal of Larry Talbot aka the Wolf Man, and rightly so, his three performances as Kharis the Mummy are more effective than his work as either Dracula or the Frankenstein monster.

He makes Kharis damned scary.  His look is such that when he enters a room, he almost paralyzes his victims with fear, which is a good thing for him, because with his limp, he’s not going to catch anybody.  You can outrun Kharis running backwards.  But Kharis always seems to corner his victims, and once he’s blocked the exit, his prey is as good as dead.

Very few of the old Universal monster movies are frightening.  I would argue that THE MUMMY’S TOMB featuring Lon Chaney Jr. as Kharis the Mummy is one of the scariest.

I dare you to watch it alone this summer without having nightmares of Kharis the Mummy breaking into your bedroom in the middle of the night.

Over there, by the wall!  Is that the Mummy’s shadow I see?

—END—

Did you enjoy this column?  You can read over 100 IN THE SPOOKLIGHT monster movie columns in my horror movie review collection IN THE SPOOKLIGHT, now available as an EBook at www.neconebooks.com, or as a print edition at  https://www.createspace.com/4293038.

—Michael